Tag Archives: Obamacare

Who’s Left Out of the ACA?

Check out my post over at 2×2 about how the most vulnerable Americans remain at risk even after the Affordable Care Act was passed.

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What Are Your Chances of Getting a New Provider if You’re on Medicaid?

You may be surprised, depending on what state you’re in. A chart pulled from data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Records Supplement (2011) and recently also published in Health Affairs, shows how states compare with the national rate of physicians and offices accepting new Medicaid patients.

States estimated to be statistically significantly different from the national average are displayed in bold.

States estimated not to be statistically significantly different are displayed in italics. (Chart courtesy of Health Affairs.)

STATE ESTIMATE (%)
All 69.4
NJ 40.4
CA 57.1
FL 59.1
CT 60.7
TN 61.4
NY 61.6
LA 62.1
IL 64.9
MD 65.9
CO 66.1
OK 67.3
GA 67.4
MO 67.6
PA 68
KS 68.2
AL 68.5
RI 68.9
HI 69.9
TX 69.9
IN 70.6
OH 72
ME 74
DC 75.2
NV 75.2
VA 76
WA 76.4
NC 76.4
DE 78.3
VT 78.4
AZ 78.5
KY 79.4
OR 79.5
MS 79.6
MA 80.6
WV 80.9
MI 81.1
NH 81.7
AK 82.1
UT 83.5
SC 84.1
ID 84.7
NM 86.3
NE 87.0
IA 87.6
MT 89.9
AR 90.7
WI 93.0
SD 94.1
ND 94.6
MN 96.3
WY 99.3

 

New Jersey is not the state you want to be in. Especially since Chris Christie has stated he will not roll out Medicaid expansions under the Affordable Care Act. While it’s true that some providers avoid Medicaid because the payout isn’t as great as it is for Medicare or private insurers, and while it is also true that community health centers often provide great care for those on Medicaid, many of those are struggling mightily with funding cuts that may not allow them to see nearly as many patients or follow-up as consistently as needed.

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SCOTUS for the Win!

Photo credit – ThinkProgress

Are you still a bit confused by the details? Check out this great paragraph in the Atlantic that details the decision.

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Conservatives Win the Healthcare Messaging War

For many left-leaning Americans, little is more important aside from the state of the economy right now than healthcare reform – and they’re inextricably linked. Coverage of healthcare reform is pretty high this week, with the expectation that the Supreme Court will hand down their decision regarding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act this Thursday. This hasn’t always been the case.

Interestingly, while this is being considered a flagship of the Obama Administration, in his first year as President, healthcare reform ranked third in terms of media coverage mentioning Obama:

Media Coverage of Stories Featuring Obama in First Year of Term – Courtesy of PEW Research Center

One would think that covering healthcare reform – and specifically, the details of the Affordable Care Act, and what the law really means – would be imperative after the passing of the ACA. Ensuring that the law was really understood by citizens would seem to be fairly essential, but what happened instead was a decline in media coverage of HCR after Obama’s first year as President – as shown by the Pew Research Center:

HCR Coverage Over Presidency – Courtesy of PEW Research Center

So what does that mean? If coverage goes down, and little has been done to ensure that people truly understand the law (for example, understand what the mandate really means, and what the implications are if it is struck down, which was recently elegantly laid out by the NY Times), the short messaging around the issue becomes even more important.

Cable news can be inflammatory, reactionary, harsh, exaggerated, and at times, unsurprisingly infuriating. They often preach to their respective choirs on the political spectrum, and because of this, I worry that they’ve become so comfortable with their audience that the arguments aren’t as sharp, or clear, as they could be. The brief messaging lacks context and nuance, and headlines or key phrases can substitute for deep understanding of one’s understanding of an issue (and taking today’s ruling on the Arizona immigration law, one can see how brief messaging can create some confusion – one headline read that SCOTUS struck down three components of the immigration law, and the next one I saw trumpeted that SCOTUS had upheld a key component of the immigration law – both were true, neither were particularly informative)

In the context of the fight for comprehensive health care, conservatives seem to have won this messaging game. The new study from the Pew Research Center shows that while liberal talk shows spent more time talking about healthcare reform -

Liberal Versus Conservative Talk Show HCR Coverage – Courtesy of PEW Research Center

- certain select terms used by healthcare reform opponents that really emphasized negativity were used at rates nearly twice that of terms used by supporters that underscored positive elements of healthcare reform:

Terms Used in HCR Debate – Courtesy of PEW Research Center

Take a look at these terms – which would you say were more compelling? Phrases that would incite more visceral, gut reactions from listeners? I can see how “insuring pre-existing conditions” would actually appeal to both sides, but this barely stood a chance against “more taxes with health care reform” which was mentioned nearly twice as many times and can certainly appeal to the financial fears of viewers. “More competition” would seem to appeal to many free-market espousing conservatives, but is trumped by “more government involvement,” which is the base fear of many Republicans. “Rationing health care” just isn’t true, but instead of rebutting that with facts about the law, HCR supporters shot back with “greedy insurance industry,” which likely wouldn’t win over any opponents to the law, who can claim that insurance agencies are just businesses, trying to capitalize on profits. And that’s where I think the HCR supporters had an in that they didn’t take – commenting on the prioritization of profits for a specific industry over the health of our communities and country as a whole.

Is the assumption that compassion is not an effective communication tool? If so, why is that? I find myself deeply moved by stories of people who are in desperate need of health care but lack the resources – insurance, financial, proximity to quality affordable care  – to get it. And I’m certain that I’m not the only one. New York Magazine today touched on the alarming fact that the moral argument – the empathetic position, the community cares idea, the position that healthcare is a fundamental human right – has been remarkably absent from the healthcare debate. I fear that it mostly plays into the uniquely American mentality that regardless of circumstance, each individual has to be able to fend for themselves. While this concept underscores certain types of resiliency and determination that are I think are overly-admired, the fact of the matter is that disregarding the circumstances is not possible. Disregarding the impact of staggering inequality of access to care and financial resources is short-sighted and, more importantly, I would say rather cruel.

If the discussions had focused more on why everyone deserves healthcare – why everyone deserves to be treated with dignity, receive comprehensive care, understand how to care for themselves – since healthcare is an essential component of our right to life (not to mention the pursuit of happiness), would the results have been different? If we appealed to our humanity and illustrated the absurdity of someone dying from a treatable illness, when people who could have helped them essentially stood by just because…they didn’t have any money? Because that’s essentially what this is – the inability to personally protect oneself and one’s family because of dearth of resources. If we had made it more personal, and less political? If we focused less on the greedy agencies, the so-called rationing of care, the increased business competition, if we had actually responded to the claim of too much government intrusion with the response that the government should in fact be intervening when doing so can save the lives of its citizens? Does the punishment of death really fit the ‘crime’ of not getting oneself health insurance, if one was not able to do so because they couldn’t afford it?

Is that the legacy we want to leave?

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