Activism, Epidemiology and Population Health, Media, Pop Culture

The Impact and Importance of AIDS Activism

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to interview David France, a journalist and filmmaker who most recently wrote and directed the movie How to Survive a Plague, which has been nominated for Best Documentary at this year’s Academy Awards. The film details the work of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), an activist organization that started in NYC’s Greenwich Village in 1987 in response to the rapidly growing and lethal AIDS epidemic among the gay population. Through political action like protests, public funeral ceremonies, and storming the buildings of the National Institutes of Health, ACT UP initiated ‘treatment activism,’ accelerating the development and distribution of AIDS treatment drugs and changing the pharmaceutical industry’s closed door research and development process to one that incorporated the insight and research of activists themselves. I wanted to learn more about what compelled him to create a film focused on this specific strain of activism, and how he saw the work of ACT UP being relevant to movements today.

My favorite of his responses was when I asked him if there were things that he wished had made it into the film but had to be cut because of the evolving narrative, and what those omissions were. I thought his answer was particularly moving:

“You know what? What broke my heart was leaving out people. People that did amazing things. Even in this very small line of inquiry that I brought to it, which is treatment activism. Other people were working on housing and prevention and pediatric issues, IV drug use issues. Even in just treatment activism I left out a huge number of players, many of whom died, whose lives in the last years were dedicated to this altruistic struggle to change the world of science and medicine. And they ultimately succeeded.”

The full transcript of the interview was published this morning over at The 2×2 Project, so head on over to read everything he had to say. Also check out Mr. France’s website, which has the archives of his incredible journalistic career, which he spent covering HIV and AIDS for years. And of course, I encourage everyone to see the film to witness just how far these grassroots activists got in advocating for and ensuring access to life-saving treatments and the disbursement of research that literally helped save millions of lives.

Standard
Epidemiology and Population Health, Public Health, Women's Health

The Staggering Incidence of Breast Cancer in the Bay Area

Check out this piece in Tuesday’s edition of my hometown paper, the San Francisco Chronicle, discussing research by the Public Health Institute on the bizarrely high incidence of breast cancer in Bay Area counties. It’s fascinating. Marin County has for years been considered a hotbed for this disease, without much explanation as to why, but now it seems that multiple Bay Area counties – with the exception of San Francisco County itself – are showing similar rates. No research was undertaken in this project to determine why, but getting a handle on which regions have the highest incidence rates is a good first step for further exploration.

This image shows the counties and regions in which invasive breast cancer is 10%-20% higher than in other parts of the state – two other regions were seen with similar incidence rates in Southern California:

Picture copyright of San Francisco Chronicle

Standard
Epidemiology and Population Health

The Incredible Rise of Diabetes in the United States

NPR had a great post dissecting the rise of diabetes in America in the last twenty years. Check out the graphic representation of the increase, it looks pretty frightening visually:

1995:

Diabetes prevalence in 1995

2000:

Diabetes prevalence in 2000

2005:

Diabetes prevalence in 2005

And, finally, 2010:

Basically: Yikes. And Happy Thanksgiving!

Standard
Epidemiology and Population Health, Health Behavior, Health Education, Public Health

Scientific American: We Are Getting Fatter and Drunker

Scientific American released a couple of interesting interactive graphs and infographics showing the rise of poor health behaviors among Americans, focusing on the changes between 1995 – 2010. Pretty interesting findings – overall, Americans are drinking more heavily, binge drinking more frequently, and overeating more regularly – but we are also smoking less, overall.

Vermont was the worst state for heavy drinking in 2010 (Tennessee had the fewest heavy drinkers), Wisconsin was the worst for binge drinking (Tennessee again had the fewest!), West Virginia was the worst for tobacco use (Utah had the fewest smokers), Mississippi was the worst for obesity (Colorado had the lowest obesity rates), and Oregon did the best in terms of exercising and physical activity (Mississippi was the worst).

You can toggle between health behaviors divided by regions in this piece, and here is the infographic showing the trends:

Image via Scientific American

Standard