Monthly Archives: February 2012

Wodka’s Sling at Sex Workers

In case you were interested in using vodka to measure the merits and statuses of sex workers, I’ll just leave this here…

This towering image is not only sitting in midtown Manhattan, but above the West Side Highway, greeting thousands of metro-area New Yorkers everyday. Wodka got in trouble last fall as well, for using a similar slogan over the holidays to peddle their wares (“Christmas Quality, Hannukah Pricing” the billboard proclaimed then).

I suppose they may be attempting to appeal to the element of class and discretion that those who patronize escort services may claim to value over what Wodka submits is the more debased act of individually seeking out sexual services from a ‘hooker’ (a word, by the way, that is pretty much on the way out). So, if you missed the subversive text here, Wodka appreciates your penny-pinching ways in soliciting the services of a prostitute on your own, but sees no issue in declassing a group of sex workers at the expense of others who they think market themselves better through a service (a service that does not, in fact, outrightly advertise prostitution). It’s all about branding! Wodka wants you to pay for what they see as the street corner lass, but be on the receiving end of pre-screened high-class.

We can get into the issue of women being trafficked into prostitution and escort services in a whole separate post, as well. Also, as an aside – what role does that sheep play in this? How can we deconstruct that?

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Filed under Advertising, Feminism, Media, Sexism

Social Media and Higher Education

Interesting infographic of the use of social media in higher education. Courtesy of the Online Universities and Columbia Teachers College EdLab:

I think this is interesting for a few reasons. What role does social media have in the administration of universities? How can they utilize social media to promote their in-house programs for students? What actually prompts students to follow higher education institutions on social media sites (aside from loyalty to their alma mater)?

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Filed under Education, Media

Senator Boxer’s Excellent Response to Attacks on Women’s Health

I’m sure most of you saw the photo of the all-male women’s health panel this past week in Congress:

Sure.

So, I wanted to spread the response of Senator Barbara Boxer, long time fighter for women’s health, and senator from my home state of California. It’s spot on:

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Filed under Feminism, Health Education, Politics, Public Health, Women's Health

Think Domestic Violence is Funny?

A whole slew of people who aren’t afraid to admit that they think domestic violence is a total joke made it clear last night when the Twitterverse erupted during Chris Brown’s performance. Other writers have well articulated the reasons why I was upset to see him perform, much less have him so vocally supported – a standing ovation? Really?  Frankly, I was surprised that there was restraint in showing Rihanna’s reaction to his numbers.

Despite the outpouring of affection for this man, I was still shocked to see the responses of women watching around the country. Trigger warning for abuse – here are some responses to his performance via Twitter:

“I’d let Chris Brown beat me up anytime ;) #womanbeater”

“Like I’ve said multiple times before, Chris Brown can beat me all he wants…I’d do anything to have him oh my”

“chris brown can beat me all he wants, he is flawless”

“Chris brown.. please beat me ;).”

“I’d let chris brown beat me any day ;).”

“I’d let chris brown punch me in the face”

“I don’t know why Rihanna complained. Chris Brown could beat me up anytime he wanted to.”

What do we gather from these tweets? (Full list here, again, trigger warning.) These go beyond the lack-of-filter in-the-moment tweets that often get people in trouble because they show that these people have a clear understanding of his actions – no one here is pleading ignorance to his abusive history or denouncing it while commenting on his performance. They are doing just the opposite, celebrating and glorifying his violence. Taking it further, they sexualize it as they coyingly ask him – instruct him – to beat them whenever he wants as an acceptable, warranted, and defensible act for being lucky enough to be his partner. The winky smiley faces, the promotion of his supposed flawlessness, the admission that they would suffer innumerable beatings just to be with him, capped off with the dismissal of Rihanna’s rightful decision to report him as a mere “complaint” – we have a major problem here. Combined with a collective short-term memory problem (all those rallying screams at the Grammy’s last night), these messages serve to tell domestic violence victims that they are overreacting, that they should not “complain” if their assailant is considered talented and desired by so many women, that abuse is entirely excusable when perpetrated by a superstar with mass appeal, and very disturbingly, that violence is, of all things, so so sexy (“i wish chris brown would punch me!” begged one tweet). The claim that they would “let” a man punch them in the face does nothing but support the dangerous stereotype that women want to be beaten, that it turns them on.

What a way to let Chris Brown forget about what he’s done. Not only does he get to say that he supposedly regrets his actions, but if he ever felt a creeping of guilt or was actually on some path to understanding what he’s done and why it’s so disturbing and utterly unacceptable – you know, the tough mental work that is required to be rehabilitated – all he’d need to do is head over to Twitter and type his own name into a search. He’d be greeted by plenty of women and men not only excusing his actions, but praising them, supporting them, begging him to repeat them. We’ve got a really long way to go, here.

Update: Charmingly, Chris Brown responded to his critics on his on Twitter page, before it seems his handlers thought it best he stay silent on the issue.

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Filed under Pop Culture, Violence, Violence Against Women

Reader Roundup (It’s Been a While…)

I am currently very guilty of completely falling behind on my (totally self-prescribed) schedule of at least weekly, hopefully twice weekly, original writings. I’m in a major data analysis crunch in my dissertation, and the stats interpretation is taking up a healthy number of my hours everyday. That being said, I’ve tried to keep up with my reading schedule, and with that in mind, I’ve done a little round up of some great articles I’ve read in the past couple weeks that I think some of my readers might enjoy. Without further ado:

For those of you interested in adolescent development, the Wall Street Journal had a great article about how the teen brain works, and how it’s changed: What’s Wrong With the Teenage Mind?

ESPN had a section on their website specifically devoted to viewers being able to comment on how much they hated female commentators. So, there’s that: ESPN Allowed People to Complain About ‘Female Commentators.’

Great details from the Huffington Post about what is at stake in an election year for women’s health, and how women’s health is used as fodder for politicos: What Does an Election Year Mean for Women’s Health and Rights?

Gail Collins, who I am a huge fan of, takes this to task as well, questioning how the allowance for employers who oppose birth control to deny coverage for female employees can be seen as a risky precedent: Tales From the Kitchen Table

Mother Jones, with excellent reporting as always, details The Republican War on Contraception – it’s even more frightening when all the facts are compressed into one terrifying testimony.

The International Center for Research on Women has a new series: HIV and AIDS: Are We Turning the Tide for Women and Girls? The chronicle case studies of women driven efforts to prevent HIV infection, projects that adapt to the need of the communities they work in (I’m always amazed that this essential element of global development remains sometimes misunderstood and underestimated), and innovative new endeavors is some great coverage on current global health initiatives aimed at reducing HIV infections and AIDS progression.

What interesting pieces have you read lately?

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Filed under Child Development and Child Health, Education, Feminism, Health Education, International, Politics, Public Health, Sexism