Category Archives: Media

Reviewing the Utilization of New Media in Sexual Health Promotion

Google Hangouts are increasingly being utilized by groups to present conversations with people in disparate locations to a wide audience. So it was exciting to be sitting front and center—so to speak—at last week’s YTH Live Google Hangout being hosted by one of my favorite organizations, ISIS (Internet Sexuality Information Services – if you don’t know them, check them out!), in preparation for the April YTH Live Conference, focusing on new and social media use and technology in the sexual health promotion space for teens.

The topic was using mobile technology, specifically text messaging, in the sexual health context. As someone who utilizes new media in all my projects, I was excited to hear what the panelists had to say, and see if my experiences were borne out in their work as well. The lineup was great, featuring Tom Subak from Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Dr. Pamela Johnson from Voxiva (developer of the great mobile maternal and newborn health program Text4Baby), Sam McKelvie from Mobile Commons, and Eric Leven from RipRoad. It was hosted by ISIS’s Executive Director and Founder, Deb Levine (who, incidentally was instrumental as the launcher of Go Ask Alice!, and as a former Alice! Health Promotion Office employee for a couple of years, I wanted to make sure to plug that).

The first question broached by Deb was around the key trends around people seeking out health information. Tom mentioned that young people are constantly and consistently surrounded by media and information sources—literally at the tip of their fingers, so finding the answers they need is way easier than it was before the advent of new media. In this vein—and luckily, I might add—it is pretty easy to ask what were historically difficult questions. Thoughts and questions about sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy and abortion don’t require the same mustering of public courage required in asking another person face-to-face about a pressing health issue.

Tom also noted something that I have definitely seen as a sexual health educator—people are usually seeking this information in moments of crisis and anxiety. It’s in these crisis moments that text messaging can play an important role. Waiting for an email response or waiting for someone to answer a question on Tumblr or Facebook—while still far quicker than waiting for an appointment with a healthcare professional—is not as quick as being able to text a worried query and getting an immediate response. One of the most fascinating things I heard in the entire Hangout was when Eric discussed his team’s Know HIV campaign, an integrated new media campaign encouraging people to get tested for HIV. He said that the busiest time for people accessing information about HIV was in the early morning hours—either it’s the time when people are mulling over the issue, or it’s the time right after they’ve had sex or potential exposure to HIV and are seeking out information immediately. Having that information easily accessible in those moments can be crucial, and can also help people plan their next steps.

The YTH Live Conference is in April, hosted by ISIS.

The YTH Live Conference is in April, hosted by ISIS. Click for details!

My favorite part of the Hangout was when the speakers were addressing two-way communication. In my own work as well as the projects on which I have advised digital strategy, I try to emphasize two major tenets: One, interactivity is key. New media truly embodies the idea of call and response, and for the conversation to be kept going you need to answer questions as well pose them, and engage followers in creative ways. I’ve done this with polls, questions, trivia that awards responders, and the solicitation of input from my most vocal network members.

Sam underscored how to address that issue, noting that two-way communication doesn’t necessarily mean organizations need someone dedicated to personal responses—great news for folks with small budgets and for people working on a consultant basis. The example given was if you text a client “Did you get a flu shot?” you can have a few answers set depending on the person’s response. If their text back is “Yes,” you can have automatic answers setup to push to the client saying, “Great, don’t forget to remind your friends!” If their text back is no, then automatic messages can be sent saying, “Here is where you can get a shot close to you,” sending a link to a nearby clinic based on their location or directing them to a site giving them more details.

The second point I generally emphasize is that you need to treat your social and new media networks similar to the way you treat your in-person networks—essentially, it’s just relationship building in another context. This is partly accomplished by the first tenet, interactivity, but it’s also accomplished by paying attention to the work of your followers and supporting it, as well as reaching out to build collaborations and coalitions with other like-minded groups, increasing the internet-based safe spaces. (The collaborations are not solely web-based, of course. Pamela emphasized that the public health departments and medical professionals who supported Text4Baby and encouraged their patients to sign up were key, and it’s always a good idea to increase the number of sources of information about sexual and reproductive health.)

There are few organizations who can thrive in new media spaces by just blasting their own content—the New York Times is the only one I can think of. For my work implementing HIV and sexual health programs on Facebook and Tumblr, paying attention to the work of my followers and voicing my appreciation and admiration of their own work made significant headway in how trusting my audience was. In terms of sexual health specifically, this is also meeting teens where they’re at—Sam mentioned this as being essential from a programmatic perspective, but it’s also essential in terms of a behavior change perspective. When I worked with teens and young adults on risk behavior change around sex and substance, the greatest indicator of their success was my ability to assess where they were in terms of thinking about changing their behavior, and help them dissect some of their ambivalence and tease out their true questions (motivational interviewing, for all you health behavior professionals!). New media is a great space in which to do this, because the conversation feels sustained and continuous, and it’s easy to see one’s progression over the course of time. And paying attention to where those conversations are happening is also key—Tumblr has been the busiest platform for my sexual health interventions, which speaks to its popularity among teens, followed by Facebook and Twitter, the latter of which people seem to use as reminders and the former being a good platform for asking questions.

Lastly, the question of how to select the right mobile media tool to implement your public health message was brought up. Eric’s response was that text message was king, since you can access people who are otherwise difficult to reach on other platforms. I tend to agree with this, since other platforms tend to require more initiation on the part of the individual, and populations have to do some seeking out on their own. Text message pushes allow your message to be sent to larger numbers of people across greater demographics, and with more frequency. Sam noted that teens of color and teens in lower-income communities who may not have full web access actually text the most, and information being sent via text can be even more helpful for these teens. That being said, I fully believe the integration of multiple new media platforms tends to ensure greatest success.

You can watch the whole Google Hangout here on the YTH Live page.

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Filed under Health Behavior, Health Education, Media, Reproductive and Sexual Health, Technology

The Impact and Importance of AIDS Activism

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to interview David France, a journalist and filmmaker who most recently wrote and directed the movie How to Survive a Plague, which has been nominated for Best Documentary at this year’s Academy Awards. The film details the work of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), an activist organization that started in NYC’s Greenwich Village in 1987 in response to the rapidly growing and lethal AIDS epidemic among the gay population. Through political action like protests, public funeral ceremonies, and storming the buildings of the National Institutes of Health, ACT UP initiated ‘treatment activism,’ accelerating the development and distribution of AIDS treatment drugs and changing the pharmaceutical industry’s closed door research and development process to one that incorporated the insight and research of activists themselves. I wanted to learn more about what compelled him to create a film focused on this specific strain of activism, and how he saw the work of ACT UP being relevant to movements today.

My favorite of his responses was when I asked him if there were things that he wished had made it into the film but had to be cut because of the evolving narrative, and what those omissions were. I thought his answer was particularly moving:

“You know what? What broke my heart was leaving out people. People that did amazing things. Even in this very small line of inquiry that I brought to it, which is treatment activism. Other people were working on housing and prevention and pediatric issues, IV drug use issues. Even in just treatment activism I left out a huge number of players, many of whom died, whose lives in the last years were dedicated to this altruistic struggle to change the world of science and medicine. And they ultimately succeeded.”

The full transcript of the interview was published this morning over at The 2×2 Project, so head on over to read everything he had to say. Also check out Mr. France’s website, which has the archives of his incredible journalistic career, which he spent covering HIV and AIDS for years. And of course, I encourage everyone to see the film to witness just how far these grassroots activists got in advocating for and ensuring access to life-saving treatments and the disbursement of research that literally helped save millions of lives.

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Filed under Activism, Epidemiology and Population Health, Media, Pop Culture

American Graduate, American Dropout

I don’t know how many of you educators were able to catch parts of PBS’ ‘American Graduate‘ series this year. It’s a great series that’s focused on the major issues of (mostly public) education in America, including urban versus rural education struggles, mentoring and counseling, adolescent health issues like substance use and sexual activity, ensuring that we’re serving the needs of immigrant students, social and economic class issues and how they impact opportunity and subsequently achievement (measured most commonly as high school graduation) and what’s behind some of the alarming and rising rates of dropping out across the country.

The latter three issues were behind a documentary that I was featured in and that aired in September. It was pioneered by a group of teen filmmakers at an organization based in Brooklyn called Reel Works, a group with a great mission that I encourage you to check out. If you want more background on the piece, check out the PBS brief before the video, which also includes a great interview with some of the teen filmmakers. Hope you find it interesting!

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Filed under Child Development and Child Health, Education, Health Behavior, Media

Is Media Use Slowing Kids Down Intellectually?

A couple interesting studies recently came out that I thought were clearly linked with implications for the development of our younger generations. I recently wrote a post for The 2×2 Project that discusses the impact of media use on the mental health of teens, so I thought this was fairly pertinent.

The first study showed how much the U.S. economy loses to social media use every year. Take a guess at what that amount is.

10 billion bucks? Nope.

100 billion? Not even close.

500 billion? Still no.

According to Mashable’s summary via LearnStuff, social media costs the U.S. economy $650 billion. Check out the infographic they put together:

I’m someone who is generally really torn about social media. I have a blog and am active on Twitter, though along with my Facebook profile I use these all primarily for semi-professional purposes. ‘Semi’ in the sense that they aren’t part of my job, but I use them to promote interesting finds or essays related to my field of public health; I’ve found the sites to be remarkably helpful in communicating important points and connecting with wider audiences compared to different – usually more traditional – media channels. I use social media heavily to promote work being done in my fellowship – my own and other fellows’ – and it unquestionably has helped us reach researchers and organizations it would have been otherwise very difficult to do.

That being said, I am also fairly hesitant about social media given that I don’t particularly like my personal life broadcast across channels, so I have to be pretty meticulous about what and how I use the mediums. I think it can be enormously helpful for children who have difficulty communicating and making connections; I also find that it can feel almost more isolating than no communication at all since it emphasizes and underscores that real interpersonal interaction isn’t exactly happening. So, I’m clearly torn.

The second study, by the great group Common Sense Media, addresses the concerns of teachers and educators that the various kinds and amount of time kids are using media at home is impacting the quality of their classroom work and engagement. 71% of teachers said that they think media use is hurting kids’ attention spans in school, 59% said that it’s impacting the students’ ability to communicate face to face, and 58% have said that the media use is impacting kids’ writing skills – and not in a good way.

Given that the LearnStuff infographic shows that 97% of college students are daily Facebook users, it seems that these symptoms have the potential to get worse at increasingly younger ages, and that by the time kids who grew up in this media-rich environment are in college…well, who knows. And 60% of people visit social media sites at work (something I found most interesting? that more people are on LinkedIn than Twitter), which are obviously impacting work in the sense that they are taking away from productivity or activities related to the job – unless the job is one that incorporates social media, as many jobs increasingly are. Not to be a doomsday reporter, but I do think the implications for these studies are very real.

Thoughts? Come chat on Twitter.

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Filed under Child Development and Child Health, Education, Media, Pop Culture, Technology

Teens + Smart Phones = More Sexual Activity?

A new study by researchers at my alma mater, University of Southern California, found that young people with smart phones were 1.5 times more likely to be sexually active than those without. Results were presented at this week’s American Public Health Association annual conference. I’ve written before about the relationship between media and imagery and its particular impact on healthy human development, so I found this study particularly interesting.

The lynchpin is the internet access, obviously, since that’s where smart phones differ from regular cell phones. The key findings pulled from the study are:

  • young people with smartphones are two times as likely to have been approached online for sex — and more than twice as likely to be sexually active with an Internet-met partner;
  • 5 percent of high school students used the internet to seek sex; and
  • non-heterosexual high school students were five times more likely to seek sex online — and more than four times as likely to have unprotected sex during their last intercourse with an online-met sex partner.

The odds of having unprotected sex with a casual and perhaps anonymous partner are of course the most troubling to public health professionals. It’s not surprising that non-heterosexual students were five times more likely to seek sex online than heterosexual teens, since those findings have been seen before and highlight the difficulty that many non-heterosexual students may have come out, the lack of social support they may feel, and the isolation that coming out may have brought on.

The researchers used a sample of 1,839 Los Angeles high school students between the ages of 12-18, and they controlled for age, race, gender, and sexual orientation. Since this is the first study to really explore this,  I’d be really interested in follow-up studies looking at other markers of sexual behavior in teens in relation to these findings. I’m also fascinated by the fact that 5% of high school students used the internet to seek sex, and am really interested in seeing how that number changes as smart phones become ubiquitous even in high school.

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Filed under Health Behavior, Media, Public Health, Reproductive and Sexual Health, Technology

How Free is Your Internet?

Very interesting report from Freedom House, showing how countries rank in terms of Internet freedom. United States is number 2. Any guesses on number 1?

Estonia! Mashable points out that “NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defense Centre of Excellence was built in Estonia in 2008, resulting in the funneling of funds to improve the country’s IT infrastructure.”

The rankings were compiled based on a few factors: obstacles to access, limits on content and violations of users’ rights. What I thought was great was that they also factored in issues like bloggers’ rights and arrests.

Thoughts? Surprised?

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Filed under Media

The 2×2 Project

It’s been a long while since I’ve written again, and the reasons are similar to my absence back in April—while I wasn’t writing another dissertation, my fellowship has just launched our website!

The 2×2 Project aims to increase discussion, debate, and understanding around current public health and epidemiological trends. Based at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia, we have a great team of writers and fellows. Come check us out! My latest post on abstinence-only education is up, along with some commentaries on the recent New York city soda ban, social networks and health, mobile apps, and climate change. We update a lot during the week, so make sure to subscribe, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter! I’ll have some pieces about the Affordable Care Act up shortly.

Happy Monday!

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Filed under Health Policy, Media, Public Health

The Conundrum of Caving to the Food Industry in the Battle Against Obesity

I just wanted to bring your attention to an excellent piece by Kelly Brownell of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale, in which she addresses the perilous slippery slope of appeasing the food industry and how that specifically impacts our fight against obesity.

He points out that all the research of calories in versus calories out, increasing exercise, cutting sodium, sugar, and fat, the problems with cutting physical activity from the daily routine of children, the abundant prevalence of fast food, and the cost of healthy, organic alternatives has been well and good – but that we are purposely avoiding and not addressing one of the biggest challenges in combating the increasing waistlines in America. The total avoidance of tackling head-on the way food is marketed, made, sold, and how quickly even healthcare organizations in need of a little extra cash may take a sponsorship or donation from a group directly contributing to many of the health issues that organization is tackling.

I know we live in a capitalist society. I know that the element most prized in this economic system is a competitive market and that supporters think private enterprise should be able to do whatever it likes in terms marketing and aggressive behavior towards consumers and that the individual is supposed to be able to make an independent choice. I also think that’s ridiculous. To assume that someone’s behavior is not influenced by the massive inundation of public messages, no matter how smart they are, disproves years of communication and sociological research. I always find it amusing when major corporations or businesses decry critics who say that advertising is harmful and misleading, when in fact most corporations and businesses are counting exactly on that – that the constant (and often subliminal, or in the least, very sly) messages they’re strategically slinging at us all the time are working their magic and ensuring that people will take the bait. As a critic of many advertising practices, a supporter of progressive paternalism (known to those on the opposite side of the aisle as a nanny state), and someone who has worked with people trying to change a range if disordered eating behaviors and poor nutrition habits, I found her piece particularly compelling and in agreement with her claim that the food industry has had plenty of time to prove itself trustworthy.

I think this line really sums it up: “When the history of the world’s attempt to address obesity is written, the greatest failure may be collaboration with and appeasement of the food industry. I expect history will look back with dismay on the celebration of baby steps industry takes (such as public–private partnerships with health organizations, “healthy eating” campaigns, and corporate social responsibility initiatives) while it fights viciously against meaningful change (such as limits on marketing, taxes on products such as sugared beverages, and regulation of nutritional labeling).”

Check it out.

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Filed under Advertising, Health Education, Media, Public Health

Social Media Continues to Make People Feel Bad About Themselves

A study out of the UK has found (as have others more than once), that use of social media sometimes doesn’t make you feel like…really socializing. Instead, it can make you feel anxious and depressed, which are more likely to make you feel withdrawn than anything else.

The study found that participants noted a drop in their own self-esteem after viewing the accomplishments of their Facebook friends. Combine this with the fact that 25% of them claimed to have had relationship issues due to online ‘confrontations’ (which could, of course, mean many things), that more than half were rendered uncomfortable when they couldn’t easily access their social media accounts, that other studies have claimed more socially aggressive (subtly termed ‘hateful’) folks use Facebook more often, that people often deliberately post bad pictures of their friends to make themselves look better and subsequently compare their weight, body size, and physical appearance to these friends, and that Facebook is cited in divorce proceedings as being problematic for couples, and you may be liable to think that this phenomenon offer little in the way of improving our lives.

A good thing to remember here, aside from the pretty remarkable things being done with social media in terms of education, research, medicine, and public health (this USC study is great news, and touches upon the influence of social networks in ways I’ve been exploring as it relates to substance use, sexual behavior, and disordered eating behaviors, and that other studies have shown the exact opposite in terms of emotional response, is that social media does allow users to tailor the perception and identity they project. Another recent study (I’ll try to find the URL for it!) showed, unsurprisingly, that what users often admire about their friends’ virtual lives is the positive sliver that their friends elect to promote about themselves.

Also encouragingly, those children and adolescents who will have known no life without social media, recently were surveyed about their use of technology and reported that they still preferred face-to-face communication. I put limits on myself in terms of use (though I’m sure to some of you it may not seem like it!) since I feel as though I miss a lot in terms of nuance when communication online, but it remains true that both my research and personal communication projects require a fairly consistent social media presence – I admit that I’m torn. As with most everything, balance is key, but how can we monitor our behavior in ways that allow us to strike that balance without teetering into territory that destroys our positive sense of self?

Thoughts? How about you ironically follow me on Twitter to discuss?

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Filed under Advertising, Child Development and Child Health, Education, Health Education, Media, Technology

SCOTUS for the Win!

Photo credit – ThinkProgress

Are you still a bit confused by the details? Check out this great paragraph in the Atlantic that details the decision.

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Filed under Health Education, Health Policy, Media, Politics, Public Health